• Saturday & Sunday, March 11 & 12: Kings Landing’s 34th Annual Sugar Bush, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Prince William, New Brunswick). Activities include encampments in the village, snowshoeing, traditional fare, children’s activities at the King’s Head Inn, sleigh rides (weather permitting) and 19th-century sugaring demonstrations. Admission: $12 (family), $7 (adult), $3.50 (child). Maple candy on the snow: $2 per stick. In additon, a pancake breakfast will be served each day from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. as a fundraising event to support the York Sunbury Search & Rescue ($11 per adult and $8 per child). For more information, call 506-363-4999.
  • Saturday, March 18: St. Patrick’s Cèilidh, 7 to 11 p.m. (Etobicoke, Ontario). Montgomery’s Inn presents Irish stew, fresh-baked bread and live traditional music by Gin Lane in the restored 1847 barroom. Admission: $5+HST. Cash bar, $5+HST for a bowl of stew, while supplies last.
  • Saturday & Sunday, March 18 & 19: Kings Landing’s 34th Annual Sugar Bush, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Prince William, New Brunswick). See Saturday & Sunday, March 11 & 12.
  • Thursday, March 30: Thirsty Thursday, 7 to 10 p.m. (Etobicoke, Ontario). Montgomery’s Inn presents Thirsty Thursday tavern night with beer, wine or a Thomas Montgomery specialty in the restored 1847 barroom, along with Irish stew, fresh-baked bread and live traditional music. Admission: Free. Cash bar; $5+HST for a bowl of stew, while supplies last. 416-394-8113.
  • Monday, March 20: Greek Meze Night, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. (Toronto). Peter Minaki of the Kalofagas food blog presents a marathon of meze (Greek small plates) at Toronto’s St. Lawrence Market Kitchen, including (among other things) Wheat Berry Salad; Poached & Shaved Asparagus Salad with Oranges; Cheeses; Artichoke with Poached Shrimp; Octopus; Clams Spring Salad and a dessert selection, all with Greek wine pairings. Admission: $85.
  • Tuesday, March 21: Workshop: Doughgirls Divine Pies, 6:30 to 9 p.m. (Vancouver). UBC Farm presents an introduction to pie-making basics. Participants will learn how to make the most tender and flaky pastry to complement the season’s many pie varieties.They will mix, roll, assemble and bake a pie to take home as well as enough pastry for the next creation. Admission: $57 + GST (general); $49 + GST (students).
  • Friday, March 31: Phyllo Workshop, 6:30 to 10 p.m. (Montreal). Peter Minakis of Kalofagas Greek Supper Club unlocks the secrets to making phyllo pastry from scratch in the Parc La Fontaine area at 2203 rue de Champlain. The class will make Spanakopita (spinach pie), Tyropita (cheese pie) and custard-filled Bougatsa. A light dinner and refreshments will also be served. Admission: $75.
  • Friday, March 31: Are Chefs, Bakers and Culinary Experts Ready for the Protein Revolution?, noon to 1:30 p.m. (Toronto). A lecture by Dr. Linda Gillis, part of the George Brown College Chef School’s Food for Thought series, which examines wine, nutrition and culinary history. It takes place on the George Brown campus at 200 King Street East, Room 315. Admission: Free.
  • Monday, April 3: Museum Morsels, 7 to 9 p.m. (Oshawa, Ontario). Parkwood National Historic Site’s Museum Morsels Culinary Heritage explores the history and traditions of the hot cross bun. info@parkwoodestate.com.
  • Friday, April 7: The Noble Art: Kitchen Management in Europe, 1300-1700 CE, noon to 1:30 p.m. (Toronto). A lecture by CHC member Dr. Ryan Whibbs, part of the George Brown College Chef School’s Food for Thought series, which examines wine, nutrition and culinary history. It takes place on the George Brown campus at 200 King Street East, Room 315. Admission: Free.
  • Friday to Sunday, April 7 to 9: Jane Austen Weekend (Toronto). See news item, above.
  • Saturday & Sunday, April 8 & 9: Vimy 100 Toronto, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Toronto). Fort York National Historic Site pays tribute to the men and women who fought for Vimy Ridge on April 9, 1917. Admission: Free.
  • Thursday, April 13: Myths and Food Fantasies, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Burlington, Ontario). The Farm & Food Care Ontario 2017 Annual Conference includes a keynote address by Professor Timothy Caulfield of the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Law and the School of Public Health, titled “Is Gwyneth Paltrow Wrong about Everything?” Besides other talks and panels, highlights of Farm & Food Care’s 2016 activities will be presented, with the Farm & Food Care Champion Award and a “Taste of Ontario” lunch, all at the Ballroom of the Royal Botanical Gardens. Admission: $100 to $150.
  • Thursday, April 27: Thirsty Thursday, 7 to 10 p.m. (Etobicoke, Ontario). Montgomery’s Inn presents Thirsty Thursday tavern night with beer, wine or a Thomas Montgomery specialty in the restored 1847 barroom, along with Irish stew, fresh-baked bread and live traditional music. Admission: Free. Cash bar; $5+HST for a bowl of stew, while supplies last. 416-394-8113.
  • Sunday April 30: To a Tea!, 10 a.m. to noon (Hamilton, Ontario). Dundurn National Historic Site presents a Victorian-era cooking workshop. Participants will prepare a 19th-century recipe with Dundurn’s cook demonstrator in Sir Allan MacNab’s kitchen and take a guided tour of Dundurn Castle. The tour will highlight Victorian tea traditions and the role of the servants in preparing and serving tea. Later, participants will enjoy their baking and tea by gaslight in the historic kitchen. 12 years and older. Admission: $45 per person. Pre-registration is required.
  • Friday, May 26: The Why of Butter Chicken Pizza: Change as a Constant in Canadian Cuisine, 7 to 9 p.m. (Toronto). A talk about the search for a true Canadian cuisine, by Lenore Newman, author of Speaking in Cod Tongues: A Canadian Culinary Journey at the George Brown College Chef School.
  • Saturday, June 3: Catharine Parr Traill Book Launch, Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, Toronto—CHC member Nathalie M. Cooke of McGill University (founding editor of CuiZine: the Journal of Canadian Food Cultures) and CHC past president Fiona Lucas will speak about their new book, Catharine Parr Traill’s Female Emigrant’s Guide: Cooking with a Canadian Classic. Attendees will have a chance to examine some of the library’s holdings that relate to pioneer Catharine Parr Traill, her family and her domestic writing.
  • June (Date TBA): 1867-themed dinner, Falstaff Family Centre, Stratford, Ontario.
  • Saturday, July 1 (Canada Day): Cross-Canada Confederation Picnic—CHC invites members and friends across the country to host an 1867- and/or 1967-themed picnic and share their photos and videos via a website created for the purpose.
  • Saturday, August 12: Lucy Maud Montgomery Outing (Norval & Glen Williams, Ontario). CHC presents a full-day tour to the home and gardens where Anne of Green Gables author Lucy Maud Montgomery lived from 1926 to 1935. Includes a lunch and transportation from the Toronto area.
  • September (Date & location TBA): The McIntosh Apple. CHC presents esteemed food writer Marion Kane, who will talk about the McIntosh apple, which appeared as a chance sport on a farm near Dundela, Ontario, and has become one of the world’s most cultivated fruits.
  • Saturday, October 21: CHC Annual General Meeting.
  • November (Date TBA): Remembrance Day at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, Enercare Centre, Exhibition Place, Toronto—CHC presentations on the theme of 1867: Confederation.
  • November/December (Date TBA): Victorian Cooking Class (Etobicoke). CHC and Montgomery’s Inn present a hands-on cooking class in the historic kitchen.
  • Saturday, February 24, 2018: Hungry for Comfort: Surviving a Canadian Winter.
  • Saturday, October 13, 2018: Canada’s Table: Our Celebration of Cookbooks.

CONTINUING

  • Daily: Historic Afternoon Tea & Tour at Fort Langley National Historic Site, tea 1 to 2:45 p.m., tour 3 to 4:30 p.m. (Fort Langley, British Columbia). An elegant afternoon tea at the Little White House (LWH) Salon Café in the coach house of the historic Marr House. Fort Langley, a Hudson’s Bay Company trading post, was first built in 1827. On the tour, visitors will hear stories of local historical characters and explore the homes and workshops of the people of the trade. Admission: $15.68 per person (plus admission fee for groups of 15–30), including tea, tour and HST. 604-513-4799 or fort.langley@pc.gc.ca.
  • Daily: Fishing the West Coast and the Canning Line, 10 a.m. to  5 p.m. (Steveston, British Columbia). The Gulf of Georgia Cannery National Historic Site offers exhibits on the development of fishing on Canada’s West Coast and modern fishing practices, too. Admission: Free in 2017 for Canada 150.
  • Sundays: Gibson House Tea & Tour, 1 to 4:30 p.m. (Toronto). Every Sunday there’s tea, cookies and a seat for you at the harvest table in the 1850s historic kitchen. Free with regular admission.
  • Indefinite run: Food Will Win the War (Ottawa). The Canada Agriculture and Food Museum presents an exhibition on the story of food on the Canadian home front during the Second World War. Focusing on shopping, eating, conserving and volunteering, it shows how Canadians fought a “war for food” to support Canada’s overseas war efforts. Admission: Free with entrance to the museum. 613-991-3044 or 1-866-442-4416.
  • To March 18: Unearthing Toronto’s Oldest Marketplace: The Archaeology of the North St. Lawrence Market (Toronto). The North St. Lawrence Market is being prepared for a major rebuild. As part of that process, the citizens of Toronto will have a rare opportunity to look into the city’s past as the building site undergoes a major archaeological dig. Concurrently, the Market Gallery will exhibit archaeological finds from the site, along with historical maps, artworks, photographs and artifacts to tell the story of North America’s longest-running continually operating food market, established in 1803. As the dig continues, new information will be added to the exhibit, showing how historical understanding can change as new research is conducted. 416-392-7604.
  • To Spring 2017: Women on the Homefront: Women’s Contributions During World War II, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Steveston, British Columbia). Gulf of Georgia Cannery presents an exhibit that shows how the women of Canada harvested the crops, kept factories running, looked after the children and raised money for the war effort while thousands of Canadian men were overseas. Admission: $7.80 (adults), $6.55 (seniors), $3.90 (youth); $19.60 (family).
  • March 13 to September 24: Prohibition in Huron County (Goderich, Ontario). Huron County Museum explores the story of prohibition and temperance in Huron County. Before prohibition, there were many taverns up and down the roads of the county, and the Gaol housed prisoners not only for public drunkenness but also for violations of the Scott Act. Temperance calls brought about years of prohibition, but in recent times new businesses and agricultural endeavours are bringing new life to an old topic.

If you have an event you think might be of interest to CHC members please forward to info@culinaryhistorians.ca no later than the 24th of the preceding month.

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