THIS MONTH (April 2018)

Toronto

  • Sunday, April 1: April Weekends at Scarborough Museum, noon to 5 p.m. Scarborough Museum offers flower-themed crafts and a yummy spring egg pancake recipe. Admission: Pay what you can.
  • Friday, April 6: Macarons for Everyone!, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Prominent food blogger Mardi Michaels teaches a hands-on class at the St. Lawrence Market kitchen that covers different flavours and colours of macarons with a variety of ganache and fillings. Admission: $85. Pre-registration is required.
  • Friday to Sunday, April 6 to 8: Toronto Jane Austen Festival. An opportunity to experience the food, music, clothing and dance of Jane Austen’s time through lectures, hands-on workshops and, of course, a ball! Admission: TBA.
  • Saturday, April 7: Hearth Cooking Workshop: Oats, 10 a.m. to noon. Gibson House Museum invites participants to make and taste a number of favourite Scottish dishes featuring oatmeal, a staple in the Scottish diet. This hands-on workshop is led by an experienced historic cook. Admission: $35. Pre-registration is required.
  • Saturday & Sunday, April 7 & 8: April Weekends at Scarborough Museum, noon to 5 p.m. See Sunday, April 1.
  • Saturday & Sunday, April 14 & 15: April Weekends at Scarborough Museum, noon to 5 p.m. See Sunday, April 1.
  • Friday, April 20: Friday Night Market Feast, 6 p.m. Chef Scott invites participants to meet at the historic St. Lawrence Market to shop and cook for an interactive five-course dinner party paired with local Ontario wines. Admission: $99. Pre-registration is required.
  • Saturday & Sunday, April 21 & 22: April Weekends at Scarborough Museum, noon to 5 p.m. See Sunday, April 1.
  • Saturday, April 21: Saturday Night Market Feast, 4 p.m. Chef Scott invites participants to meet at the historic St. Lawrence Market to shop and cook for an interactive five-course dinner party paired with local Ontario wines. Admission: $99. Pre-registration is required.
  • Sunday, April 22: Macarons for Everyone!, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Prominent food blogger Mardi Michaels teaches a hands-on class at the St. Lawrence Market kitchen that covers different flavours and colours of macarons with a variety of ganache and fillings. Admission: $85. Pre-registration is required.
  • Sunday, April 22: Choux Pastry Made Easy, 2 to 4 p.m. Prominent food blogger Mardi Michaels invites participants to learn how to work with choux pastry to create delectable éclairs, profiteroles, chouquettes and gougères (savoury cheese puffs). Admission: $80. Pre-registration is required.
  • Saturday & Sunday, April 28 & 29: Canadian Taste Buds: Lemon Meringues, noon to 5 p.m. Scarborough Museum offers a sweet recipe for spring. Admission: Pay what you can.
  • Saturday & Sunday, April 28 & 29: Battle of York Weekend, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fort York presents a commemoration of the 205th anniversary of the Battle of York, fought on April 27, 1813, including Georgian cooking in the Officers’ Quarters kitchen. Regular admission applies.

Greater Toronto & Hamilton Area (GTHA)

  • Thursday, April 26: Thirsty Thursday, 7 to 10 p.m. (Etobicoke, Ontario). Montgomery’s Inn presents Thirsty Thursday tavern night with beer, wine or a Thomas Montgomery specialty in the restored 1847 barroom, along with Irish stew, fresh-baked bread and live traditional music. Admission: Free. Cash bar; $5 for a bowl of stew, while supplies last. 416-394-8113.

Other Regions

  • Saturday, April 14: Winter Foraging Workshop, 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. (Vancouver). UBC Farm presents a workshop on wild winter treasures like seaweeds, winter mushrooms, edible plants and roots with chef Robin Kort of Swallow Tail Culinary Adventures. Admission: $35 + GST (general); $28 + GST (students).
  • Sunday, April 22: Mad Hatters Tea Party, 2 p.m. (Peterborough, Ontario). The Volunteers of Hutchison House Museum host a light lunch in the historic Keeping Room. Tours of the museum will be conducted by costumed interpreters. Guests are invited to wear their best or craziest hats. Admission: $25. Pre-registration is required at 705-743-9710.
  • Sunday, April 29: Butter and Cheese, 1 to 5 p.m. (Kitchener, Ontario). In this family-friendly event, Joseph Schneider Haus interpreters demonstrate butter- and cheese-making techniques used by Pennsylvania German settlers to Canada. Admission: Free with regular museum admission.

LOOKING AHEAD (May 2018)

Toronto

  • Saturday, May 5: Hearth Cooking Workshop: An Alias Grace Feast, 10 a.m. to noon. Gibson House presents a hands-on workshop in which participants will prepare and taste a selection of foods that are referenced in Margaret Atwood’s novel, including roasted meat, vegetables and sweets. Not recommended for children under 12. Admission: $35. Pre-registration is required at 416-395-7432.
  • Saturday, May 12: Baking with Blossoms Workshop, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mackenzie House celebrates the blooming of May flowers by exploring Victorian traditions of flower giving and preserving while making sweet treats on the 1860s wood stove. In addition to baking with flowers such as lavender and dandelion, visitors will also get the chance to print a historic recipe on the 1850s Washington Press. Admission: $30. Pre-registration is required online or at 416-392-6915.
  • Friday, May 18: Friday Night Market Feast, 6 p.m. Chef Scott invites participants to meet at the historic St. Lawrence Market to shop and cook for an interactive five-course dinner party paired with local Ontario wines. Admission: $99. Pre-registration is required.
  • Saturday, May 19: Spring Beerfest TO, noon to 7 p.m. Fort York National Historic Site hosts the 5th annual Beer Festival’s spring event. Tickets go on sale April 10.
  • Saturday, May 25: Saturday Night Market Feast, 4 p.m. Chef Scott invites participants to meet at the historic St. Lawrence Market to shop and cook for an interactive five-course dinner party paired with local Ontario wines. Admission: $99. Pre-registration is required.

Greater Toronto & Hamilton Area (GTHA)

  • Thursday, May 30: Thirsty Thursday, 7 to 10 p.m. (Etobicoke, Ontario). Montgomery’s Inn presents Thirsty Thursday tavern night with beer, wine or a Thomas Montgomery specialty in the restored 1847 barroom, along with Irish stew, fresh-baked bread and live traditional music. Admission: Free. Cash bar; $5 for a bowl of stew, while supplies last. 416-394-8113.

Other Regions

  • Wednesday, May 2: Heritage Luncheon, two seatings, noon & 1:30 p.m. (Peterborough, Ontario). Hutchinson House presents a heritage luncheon served by costumed interpreters. Admission: $15, including coffee/tea, entrée and dessert. Pre-registration is required at 705-743-9710.
  • Sunday, May 6: Mother’s Day Tea, two seatings, noon & 2 p.m. (Brampton, Ontario). Historic Bovaird House offers a selection of gourmet teas, chocolate-dipped strawberries and fresh-baked scones with fruit preserves. Admission: $17.50. Pre-registration is required at 905-874-2804 or bovairdhouse@yahoo.ca.
  • Thursday, May 10: The Law Is in the Seed: A Community “Cornvergence,” 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (Ohsweken, Ontario). A celebration of the gift of corn through food, culture, and creativity, presented by Chandra F. Maracle, founder of Kakhwa’on:we/Real People Eat Real Food. Includes a screening and discussion of The Gift, a film by Gary Farmer; sharing corn through the story of Creation with Amber Meadow Adams; the historical power of corn with Rick Hill; the health legacies of hunger in residential schools with Ian Mosby; and creating community through corn with Chandra Maracle. Admission: $55. Register on Eventbrite by May 1.
  • Saturday, May 12: Pink Tea Celebrating Women, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. (Oshawa, Ontario). Parkwood National Historic Site presents a beautiful tribute to Canadian women in celebration of the 100th anniversary of women winning the right to vote in Canada. The pink tea tradition developed over a century ago when women throughout Canada used pink teas to engender solidarity among female suffragists. The Parkwood Pink Tea will pay homage to the idea of the original “polite pekoe party,” with a raffle, a curator’s talk and a lovely catered afternoon tea. Admission: $75. Pre-registration is required.
  • Sunday, May 13: Mother’s Day Tea, two seatings, noon & 2 p.m. (Brampton, Ontario). Historic Bovaird House offers a selection of gourmet teas, chocolate-dipped strawberries and fresh-baked scones with fruit preserves. Admission: $17.50. Pre-registration is required at 905-874-2804 or bovairdhouse@yahoo.ca.
  • Saturday, May 26: Cooking for the Workers, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Kitchener, Ontario). Joseph Schneider Haus interpreters demonstrate foods served at Pennsylvania German settlers’ workers bees. Dessert samples available. Admission: Free with regular museum admission.
  • Sunday, May 27: Cooking for the Workers, 1 to 5 p.m. (Kitchener, Ontario). See Saturday, May 26.
  • Wednesday, May 30: Mad Hatter Tea, 3 p.m. (Pickering, Ontario). Pickering Museum Village presents a discussion of the 19th-century idea of childhood and Lewis Carroll’s books, along with tea and costumed interpreter(s) leading an interactive presentation on the tradition of tea and socials throughout the courses of the meal. Admission: $32, including a recipe handout. Pre-registration is required online or in person at the Gift Shop.

CONTINUING

  • April 2 to September 16: Agriculture in Huron County (Goderich, Ontario). Huron County Museum & Archives presents an exhibit on modern agricultural practices, successes and challenges in Huron County.
  • May 21 to August 31: Mixed Messages: Making and Shaping Culinary Culture in Canada (Toronto). An exhibition of rare and interesting cookery material at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, featuring a diverse selection of rare Canadian cookbooks, periodicals, manuscripts and culinary objects from about 1825 to 1967.
  • Through October 2018: From Glen Notes to War Notes: A Canadian Perspective on the First World War in Rilla of Ingleside (Guelph, Ontario). The first exhibit in the new Archival & Special Collections space in the University of Guelph’s McLaughlin Library, co-curated by staff with students and faculty from the Department of History, commemorates the 100th anniversary of the end of the WWI. Materials are drawn from the U of G Library’s extensive L.M. Montgomery Collection.
  • Daily: Historic Afternoon Tea & Tour at Fort Langley National Historic Site, tea 1 to 2:45 p.m., tour 3 to 4:30 p.m. (Fort Langley, British Columbia). An elegant afternoon tea at the Little White House (LWH) Salon Café in the coach house of the historic Marr House. Fort Langley, a Hudson’s Bay Company trading post, was first established in 1827. On the tour, visitors will hear stories about local historical characters and explore the homes and workshops of the people of the trade. Admission: $15.68 per person (plus admission fee for groups of 15–30), including tea, tour and HST. 604-513-4799 or fort.langley@pc.gc.ca.
  • Daily: Fishing the West Coast and the Canning Line, 10 a.m. to  5 p.m. (Steveston, British Columbia). The Gulf of Georgia Cannery National Historic Site offers exhibits on the development of fishing on Canada’s West Coast and modern fishing practices, too. Admission: Free for Canada 150.
  • Sundays: Gibson House Tea & Tour, 1 to 4:30 p.m. (Toronto). Every Sunday, there’s tea, cookies and a seat for you at the harvest table in the 1850s historic kitchen. Free with regular admission.
  • Indefinite run: Food Will Win the War (Ottawa). The Canada Agriculture and Food Museum presents an exhibition on the story of food on the Canadian home front during the Second World War. Focusing on shopping, eating, conserving and volunteering, the exhibit shows how Canadians fought a “war for food” to support Canada’s overseas war efforts. Other ongoing exhibits explore Food Preservation, Potash, Space Technology and Canola. Admission: Free with entrance to the museum. 613-991-3044 or 1-866-442-4416.

Upcoming Conferences

Compiled by Julia Armstrong

2018 

April 14 (York, England)
33rd LEEDS SYMPOSIUM ON FOOD HISTORY AND TRADITIONS
“A Modest Efficiency” is this year’s theme, in which attendees consider the food habits of relatively ordinary people in past centuries. See the website for the full schedule and to download an application form.

May 22 to 24, 2018 (Guelph & Toronto, Ontario)
ARRELL FOOD SUMMIT
During this inaugural event, Canadian and international researchers and senior business and government officials will explore what lies ahead in Canadian agri-food. Days 1 & 2 will take place on the University of Guelph campus. Day 3 will be at a downtown Toronto venue. Register via the AFI site.May 27 to 29 (Regina)
13th ANNUAL ASSEMBLY OF THE CANADIAN ASSOCIATION FOR FOOD STUDIES

The CAFS will host its 13th conference at the University of Regina in conjunction with the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. The theme is inspired by the prairies: the challenges that were overcome by those who thrived there for thousands of years; and the many peoples today—Indigenous and non-Indigenous—who share the land and contribute to diverse food cultures, communities and farming practices. The organizers write: “Understanding our history and reflecting on the past can help us to move forward in addressing the painful legacy of colonialism, in establishing a sustainable relationship to the land, and in preserving and enriching our intricate relationships between food and culture.”

May 29 to 30 (Dublin, Ireland)
DUBLIN GASTRONOMY SYMPOSIUM
“Food and Power” is the theme and can be interpreted literally (e.g., superfoods) or metaphorically (e.g., as a symbol of status). Questions to be examined range from “Who has the power to decide what a nation eats?” to “Did chefs lose power when their recipes and techniques began to be published?” 

June 13 to 16 (Madison, Wisconsin)
ANNUAL ASFS/AFHVS CONFERENCE
Since 1992, the meeting of the Association for the Study of Food and Society (ASFS) has been held along with that of the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society (AFHVS). This year’s theme is “The Agroecological Prospect: The Politics of Integrating Food and Farming with Values and the Land.” April 15 is the deadline for early-bird registration rates; see the conference website.

July 6 to 8 (Oxford, England)
OXFORD SYMPOSIUM ON FOOD & COOKERY
The theme for 2018 is “Seeds”: the cuisine of seeds, seed conservation, seeds and symbolism, seeds and intellectual property rights. To attend, see registration details on the symposium website.

August 14 to 17 (Stockholm, Sweden)
PANEL DURING EASA2018–MOVING ON: FOOD FUTURES AND REIMAGINING UNCERTAINTY
Deadline for proposals: April 9
Does your research focus on food practices, food supply chains, local cuisines or agriculture in a changing environment? This food-focused panel will be part of the European Association of Social Anthropologists conference. If interested, please submit your proposal to the panel convenors using the online application system.

September 20 to 21 (Edinburgh, Scotland)
1st BIANNUAL CONFERENCE ON FOOD AND COMMUNICATION
“Food is one of the key aspects through which we represent ourselves individually and as a community,” write the organizers of this conference. “It is also located at the core of many social issues and issues and interests.” See the details about attending and the list of keynote speakers.

October 4 to 5 (Antalya, Turkey)
THIRD TASTE OF CITY CONFERENCE: FOOD AND MARKETING
Deadline for proposals: June 30
This conference focuses on understanding the role that food plays in place marketing and branding, including food tourism and multidisciplinary approaches to gastronomy and culture. Proposals are invited for the many sub-themes, which include the marketing of heritage food.

October 25 to 26 (Vancouver, British Columbia)
EIGHTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON FOOD STUDIES
Proposals are welcome. See the call for papers.
The three themes of the conference are food production and sustainability; food, nutrition and health; food politics, policies and cultures. Submit proposals and register here.

November 15 to 16 (Tours, France)
FOOD AS A CULTURAL HERITAGE: CHALLENGES, PROCESSES AND PERSPECTIVES
Organized by the European Institute for the History and Culture of Food (IEHCA), the objective of the conference is to advocate a multidisciplinary approach to food heritage and to examine, from a European and international standpoint, countries that have successfully added food elements to UNESCO’s list of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

November 16 to 17 (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
AMSTERDAM SYMPOSIUM ON THE HISTORY OF FOOD
This annual conference is a collaboration between the University of Amsterdam’s Special Collections and School of Historical Studies and the Social & Cultural Food Studies (FOST) of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. It is targeted at both an academic and professional audience. See the conference page for the call for papers. Registration begins in July.

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